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Four Ways To Maximize Workplace Productivity By Checking Your Technology Use


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Today’s technology landscape is stippled with countless innovations designed to increase productivity, both in and outside of the workplace. The advent of smartphones has blurred the lines between work and home, providing unlimited access to email, documents and never-ending to-do lists at the touch of a finger, day or night. According to a Deloitte research study, 61% of people check their smartphones within five minutes of waking up.

In the workplace, many tech enterprises spend much of the day, if not all of it, looking at a screen. New apps and platforms emerge every day claiming to improve time management, increase efficiency and streamline collaboration — however, these innovations can often do more harm than good by introducing new distractions into the workplace. How can businesses leverage and limit technology to increase productivity, maximize talent and resources and support a healthy work-life balance? Here are four tips to check in by checking out.

Limit Your Time On Email

A recent UC Irvine study found that it takes 23 minutes on average to return to a task after an interruption. Though it may sound counterintuitive, email is the biggest interruption in day-to-day corporate life. Every email check deters your attention, and you lose valuable time refocusing your energy on the task at hand.

Consider removing email notifications from your desktop and smartphone, and set three established times throughout the day to respond to emails after completing a task. This strategy will allow you to tackle each day proactively by accomplishing the things you set out to do, rather than constantly reacting to incoming items that might not require your immediate attention. Limiting your time on email also helps to establish healthy boundaries by setting expectations with your correspondents regarding your availability.

Separate The Chatter

The last decade has introduced new channels for internal communication, such as Slack, Hangouts, Hive and countless others. These apps are great for quick and easy communication among teams, but they can also become noisy and distracting if not properly organized.

As a best practice, create separate channels for each of your departments, as well as general office memos. Also consider creating a “random” channel as a dedicated space for watercooler chit-chat, personal anecdotes and non-workplace conversation that will inevitably arise. Creating a separate, muted space for this kind of chatter will allow your main channels to remain productive and uninterrupted without harming your company culture.

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Shutterstock

Today’s technology landscape is stippled with countless innovations designed to increase productivity, both in and outside of the workplace. The advent of smartphones has blurred the lines between work and home, providing unlimited access to email, documents and never-ending to-do lists at the touch of a finger, day or night. According to a Deloitte research study, 61% of people check their smartphones within five minutes of waking up.

In the workplace, many tech enterprises spend much of the day, if not all of it, looking at a screen. New apps and platforms emerge every day claiming to improve time management, increase efficiency and streamline collaboration — however, these innovations can often do more harm than good by introducing new distractions into the workplace. How can businesses leverage and limit technology to increase productivity, maximize talent and resources and support a healthy work-life balance? Here are four tips to check in by checking out.

Limit Your Time On Email

A recent UC Irvine study found that it takes 23 minutes on average to return to a task after an interruption. Though it may sound counterintuitive, email is the biggest interruption in day-to-day corporate life. Every email check deters your attention, and you lose valuable time refocusing your energy on the task at hand.

Consider removing email notifications from your desktop and smartphone, and set three established times throughout the day to respond to emails after completing a task. This strategy will allow you to tackle each day proactively by accomplishing the things you set out to do, rather than constantly reacting to incoming items that might not require your immediate attention. Limiting your time on email also helps to establish healthy boundaries by setting expectations with your correspondents regarding your availability.

Separate The Chatter

The last decade has introduced new channels for internal communication, such as Slack, Hangouts, Hive and countless others. These apps are great for quick and easy communication among teams, but they can also become noisy and distracting if not properly organized.

As a best practice, create separate channels for each of your departments, as well as general office memos. Also consider creating a “random” channel as a dedicated space for watercooler chit-chat, personal anecdotes and non-workplace conversation that will inevitably arise. Creating a separate, muted space for this kind of chatter will allow your main channels to remain productive and uninterrupted without harming your company culture.

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